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  • Be Heard: Navigating the System in the 21ST Century

    Product not yet rated Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/27/2020

    For the webinar all proceeds go to benefit the Region IV Covid relief fund. This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of General Studies (GS) and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. Be Heard: Navigating the System in the 21ST Century will look at how to navigate systems to be able to understand how to effectively make change locally or nationally. Participants will be better prepared to use current laws and legislation to be able to advocate effectively for services.

    For the webinar all proceeds go to benefit the Region IV Covid relief fund. This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of General Studies (GS)  and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. 

    Be Heard: Navigating the System in the 21ST Century will look at how to navigate systems to be able to understand how to effectively make change locally or nationally.  Participants will be better prepared to use current laws and legislation to be able to advocate effectively for services.


    Target Audience

    General audience, interpreters, Deaf community and students

    This workshop will look at how to navigate systems to be able to understand how to effectively make change locally or nationally.  Participants will be better prepared to use current laws and legislation to be able to advocate effectively for services.

    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.
    At the end of the webinar participants will be able to 
    1. State two advocacy techniques for creating change and social justice.
    2. Differentiate between the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the ADA (1990).
    3. State the difference between advocacy and self-advocacy. 

     




    Amanda Tuite

    Born and raised in Texas, Amanda previously served as a Communication Access Specialist II in the Office of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS), under the Texas Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Amanda attended the University of North Texas and has years of experience as an advocate on behalf of Deaf and Hard of Hearing consumers who were denied access to communication. She has given workshops on various topics such as Deaf Self Advocacy Training (DSAT), Disclosing your Disability, Law Enforcement Training, Soft Skills, and Cultural Competency.  Amanda also provides nation-wide advocacy training to teach people who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing about their disability rights.  In addition to her work for the state, she has been active in several professional organizations, including Deaf Women United and Miss Deaf Texas organization.  

  • 3 Easy Ways to Take Charge of your Taxes as a Freelance Interpreter

    Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/02/2020

    This webinar is 0.1 CEUs in the category of General Studies (GS) and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. Do you ever feel unprepared for tax season? Are you confused about deductions, quarterlies and handling multiple income sources? You are not alone! With interpreting being such a unique field, it can be difficult to find accurate tax guidance. In this workshop, participants will learn 3 practical strategies interpreters can use to get organized for this year’s taxes and make future tax seasons smoother. With an efficient process in place, interpreters can breathe easier knowing they are ready for tax season every year.

    Do you ever feel unprepared for tax season? Are you confused about deductions, quarterlies and handling multiple income sources? You are not alone! With interpreting being such a unique field, it can be difficult to find accurate tax guidance. In this workshop, participants will learn 3 practical strategies interpreters can use to get organized for this year’s taxes and make future tax seasons smoother. With an efficient process in place, interpreters can breathe easier knowing they are ready for tax season every year.



    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.
    • Participants will be able to indicate at least 2 differences between 1099 and W2 income
    • Participants will be able to identify at least 3 business deductions
    • Participants will be able to identify at least 3 recordkeeping apps
    • Participants will learn how to save for and pay quarterly estimated taxes

    Rosemary Bocian (Moderator)

    Rosemary Bocian, MA, EA, NIC, has been an ASL freelance interpreter for 9 years. In 2017 she co-authored the book "The Interpreter's Quick Guide to Self-Employment" which is currently being used by Interpreter Training Programs nationwide and sold on Amazon as well as at select Barnes & Nobles locations. Following publication, she began teaching workshops across the nation including the 2019 RID National Conference. Rosemary received both her Bachelor’s in ASL Interpretation and Master’s in Deaf Studies: Culture from Gallaudet University. As a professional tax preparer (EA), author and seasoned speaker, Rosemary presents the complex world of taxes in plain language so that interpreters can thrive in the profession.          

  • BLeGIT Pride Webinar Series

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Product(s)

    This webinar series includes four webinars that are worth 0.8 PS PPO CEUs. Webinars do not need to be completed in any particular order.

    This webinar series includes four webinars that are worth 0.8 PS PPO CEUs. Webinars do not need to be completed in any particular order. 

  • Challenges to LGBTQ Liberation: The Trump Era and Beyond

    Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/30/2020

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) PPO and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. The landmark ruling in favor of marriage equality in 2015 marked what many thought was the penultimate victory for LGBTQ people in the U.S. But two judicial appointees later from the current presidency, it is a new court. The upcoming ruling on non-discrimination protections for LGBTQ people will be instructive in what advocates and allies can expect from the Supreme Court in future cases of equality. The policies being enacted and decisions made now will have generational impacts on previous LGBTQ advancements. LGBTQ Americans are vulnerable and uncertain about rights that were once protected and secured and that now have been eroded. Come to learn the latest about targeted anti-LGBTQ efforts and what can be done.

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) PPO and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. 

    The landmark ruling in favor of marriage equality in 2015 marked what many thought was the penultimate victory for LGBTQ people in the U.S. But two  judicial appointees later from the current presidency, it is a new court. The upcoming ruling on non-discrimination protections for LGBTQ people will be instructive in what advocates and allies can expect from the Supreme Court in future cases of equality. The policies being enacted and decisions made now will have generational impacts on previous LGBTQ advancements. LGBTQ Americans are vulnerable and uncertain about rights that were once protected and secured and that now have been eroded. Come to learn the latest about targeted anti-LGBTQ efforts and what can be done.


    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.
    At the end of the webinar participants will be able to 
      Compare and contrast rights (federal vs state) in regard to relationship recognition in the current laws.
      Explain key challenges for same-sex couples in accessing rights, benefits and services.
      Devise ally behaviors to support equality in the laws.
      Differentiate three key issues that potentially disempower same-sex couples from having equality in the laws.



    CM Hall

    Ed.M., NIC Advanced, EIPA Ed: K-12

    CM Hall, Ed.M., NIC Advanced, EIPA Ed: K-12
    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers/They

    CM has long been a community activist, committed to equity and social justice.

    Professionally, CM manages dual careers in both the field of interpreting grant administration and teaching. CM has taught LGBTQ Studies at Western Oregon University since 2012. She is a nationally‐certified sign language interpreter, having earned a Bachelor's in Interpreting from Western Oregon University and a Master's in Education with an emphasis in LGBTQ and Gender Studies from Oregon State University.

    CM has worked as a fundraiser and political strategist for queer nonprofit organizations and campaigns, and also leads social justice‐themed and fundraising how‐to workshops. She produces an annual Coming Out Monologues storytelling event in Portland. CM has been recognized for her advocacy work by Basic Rights Oregon, Pride Northwest, and the Gay & Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest, Campus Pride, the Human Rights Campaign, and the Oregon Association of the Deaf, the Oregon Deaf & Hard of Hearing Advisory Committee, and the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, and Western Oregon University’s Stonewall Center.

    CM is also the first out queer person elected in 2018 to the Newport, Oregon City Council.


  • Beauty and the Butch: The Lesbian Interpreter

    Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) PPO and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. This webinar will delve into the research done by Stephanie Ehrlich on lesbian interpreters. Specifically about the “coming out” to consumers experience. Topics of stress, appearance, coming out stages, the homosexual career, and future research will be covered. Participants will have an opportunity to compare their own experiences to the lives of those in the research.

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) PPO and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. 

    This webinar will delve into the research done by Stephanie Ehrlich on lesbian interpreters.  Specifically about the “coming out” to consumers experience.  Topics of stress, appearance, coming out stages, the homosexual career, and future research will be covered. Participants will have an opportunity to compare their own experiences to the lives of those in the research.


    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.
    At the end of the webinar participants will be able to 
      1. Identify where they are within the Cass model. 
      2. Explain their experiences at different stages of the Cass model. 
      3. Compare and contrast their own experiences to the research data. 
      4. Identify how coming out to consumers impacts their stress levels. 
      5. Understand and express personal investment in the group norms for the training. 
      Participant will be able to connect with why group norms are important for the dynamic of the training. Hear how diverse the group’s experience with LGBTQ people and identity are. To provide an opportunity for participants to empathetically connect and reflect on the experience of having (or not having) privilege.



    Stephanie Ehrlich

    Ed: K-12, M.A.

    Stephanie Ehrlich, Ed: K-12, M.A. in Interpreting Studies with an emphasis in Teaching from Western Oregon University. Her thesis was written on lesbian interpreters and can be found at https://digitalcommons.wou.edu... For her internship, she taught a workshop titled “LGBTQ 101: Being a Froot Loop in a World of Cheerios”. Stephanie received her B.S. in an Interpreter Training Program at Troy University with Magna Cum Laude honors. She did her educational interpreter internship with Wichita State University and her community interpreter internship with Florida State Mental Health Hospital. She is currently working as a staff interpreter at Unified School District 261 and has been in that capacity for the past ten years. She also has been working as a Video Relay interpreter for almost four years.

  • HomoABCedario: The Challenges with Spanish LGBTQ+'s Vocabulary and ASL

    Product not yet rated Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/16/2020

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) PPO and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. When we are talking about the LGBTQ+ vocabulary in the USA we all know that it is as diverse as its members. Imagine now how difficult it could be to manage and work with a LGBTQ+ vocabulary in a language that is used as a main formal language in over 20+ countries ALL AROUND THE WORLD. What would be the challenges that interpreters might face at work? What tools, techniques or guides can be used by the Spanish/English/ASL interpreters? How can the interpreters recognize if the word is an argot, a slang, a regional slang, offensive or a proper accepted term?

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) PPO and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. 

    When we are talking about the LGBTQ+ vocabulary in the USA we all know that it is as diverse as its members. Imagine now how difficult it could be to manage and work with a LGBTQ+ vocabulary in a language that is used as a main formal language in over 20+ countries ALL AROUND THE WORLD. What would be the challenges that interpreters might face at work? What tools, techniques or guides can be used by the Spanish/English/ASL interpreters? How can the interpreters recognize if the word is an argot, a slang, a regional slang, offensive or a proper accepted term?



    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.

    By receiving a terminology list, the participant will identify the country of origin of each term. They will identify if it is a slang, formal word or if it is an offensive term. They will analyze and determine what is the correct correlation or translation into ASL of each of those terms. Participants will have hands-on experience with dialogues and scripts where they will put in practice the identification and selection of correct terms to be used during their interpretation.

    Carmelo Falú-Rodríguez

    Carmelo Falú-Rodríguez is a native puertorican who learn sign language at eleven years old from the deaf community in Puerto Rico and later received interpreting training at a Non-Profit organization known as Servicios Orientados al Sordo (S.O.S.). He attended the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus where he took courses towards a BA. As Trilingüal interpreter he has worked in a vast ray of scenarios: Legal, Medical, Platform, Educational, Artistic, VRS in Puerto Rico and the USA. He served as Mano a Mano Board Member from 2007 - 2019 as Region Rep, Vice-President and later as a President. Also has been part of RID BLeGIT* Member Section Chair and Co-Chair as well.



    Ricardo Lopez

    Ricardo Lopez is a Deaf native from Puerto Rico. Graduated from Gallaudet University with a Master of Science in Educational Technology/Special Education, and a Master in School Library Media from the University of Maryland at College Park. His career path being a teacher for deaf students in Cincinnati, Ohio, a federal proposals officer at the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration in Washington, DC, and a program analyst with the Office of Inspector General at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Mr. Lopez is currently employed at the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, a division of Gallaudet University. His community involvement includes being an advisory committee member on closed-captioning television with federal grants, past president of the National Literary Society of the Deaf, and guest speaker during Deaf History Month at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Public Library and the Library of Congress. Mr. Lopez is currently serving as chairperson of the Maryland Deaf Culture Digital Library.

  • Protactile and Black & Brown Trans-Queerness: Reducing Antagonisms in Our Work

    Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/09/2020

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) PPO and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. This webinar will Expand awareness on QPOC DB/Protactile users needs and the antagonism they experience.

     This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) PPO and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. This webinar will Expand awareness on QPOC DB/Protactile users needs and the antagonism they experience.



    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.

    At the end of webinar participants will be able:

    To understand  and identify some  people who harm may not realize that harm (oppressing) is not always intentional 

    To identify and utilize fundamental skills to question their own bias of multiple identities and  cultural aspect of  Deaf Trans/Non-Binary Folks of Color  on evaluation

    To identify some ideas on developing their understanding of the function of power and control across Gender Identity, Race and Racialized Blindness

    To identify  and self- recognize the harm of cultural-blaming (intentional and unintentional) by managing their bias and assumptions when learning working with DeafBlind Queer of Color

    To understand and recognize the importance of all of this and incorporate accountability in ethical interpretation work

    Najma Johnson

    Executive Director

    Najma Johnson is a Black PanQueer DeafBlind protactile user, community educator and current Executive Director of DAWN. DAWN is a transformative justice organization based in DC that supports DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Late Deafened survivors of sexual, power based violence and human trafficking. They have a master's in mental health counseling and have worked for the last 17 years to reduce violence in all the communities where they exist.

  • Video Interpreting from Home – Where Do I Start?

    Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/07/2020

    In light of the COVID-19 emergency and need for social distancing, interpreters need to be prepared to provide access from their home office. But where to start? What equipment is needed? What about internet speed? Must there be a blue background? Learn some technical basics as well as ethical considerations and recommended practice from an interpreter who spent a number of years working primarily as a remote, private practice interpreter from home.

    In light of the COVID-19 emergency and need for social distancing, interpreters need to be prepared to provide access from their home office. But where to start? What equipment is needed? What about internet speed? Must there be a blue background? Learn some technical basics as well as ethical considerations and recommended practice from an interpreter who spent a number of years working primarily as a remote, private practice interpreter from home. 

    In light of the COVID-19 emergency and need for social distancing, interpreters need to be prepared to provide access from their home office. But where to start? What equipment is needed? What about internet speed? Must there be a blue background? Learn some technical basics as well as ethical considerations and recommended practice from an interpreter who spent a number of years working primarily as a remote, private practice interpreter from home. 

    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members.
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.
    At the end of the webinar participants will be able to 
    1. List minimum technical requirements to provide remote interpreting access. 
    2. Identify gaps in their own home setup and implement changes necessary to provide quality services. 
    3. Apply the CPC to evaluate the appropriateness of each assignment to occur via video, work with a hearing or deaf team, and how to make alternate plans. 




    1. Kaleidoscope Within the Asian Deaf Community

      Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/17/2020

      This webinar is 0.1 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) PPO and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. This session is an introduction to the diversity within the Asian Deaf communities. Asia is one of the largest continents divided by several regions with each bringing forth its own myriad of cultures and traditions. What is it like to be an Asian Deaf American? How can we as sign language interpreters learn how to navigate through this space within the Deaf community?

      This webinar is 0.1 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level.

      This session is an introduction to the diversity within the Asian Deaf communities. Asia is one of the largest continents divided by several regions with each bringing forth its own myriad of cultures and traditions. What is it like to be an Asian Deaf American? How can we as sign language interpreters learn how to navigate through this space within the Deaf community?

      Target Audience: Deaf and ASL Interpreters

      image
      imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
      imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
      imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members.
      RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.

      Participants will become familiar with each sub-region of Asia.

      Participants will become familiar with some of the common intersections between Asian and Deaf identity.

      Participants will gain better understanding of how to work with individuals from Asian background.

      The webinar platform that will be used is GoToTraining. Please make sure to read the information below to ensure easy webinar access.



      Click on the links below for more information

      Download GoToTraining Now

      I Can't Join my Session

      Register for a Session

      System Requirements for Attendees

      Why Isn't the Download Working

      Jerrin George

      PDIC

      Jerrin George is a Deaf Interpreter born and raised in Long Island, New York and is working as a freelance interpreter within the Greater Los Angeles area. Jerrin serves as Deaf Member at Large with Southern California Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf. He volunteers his time with several Deaf non-profit organizations and is passionate about being an agent of change through his work.

    2. Beyond the Cover: Judging the Story

      Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) and Power, Privilege, and Oppression (PPO) and is presented at the Some Knowledge level. We’ve all heard the saying, “don’t judge a book by its cover.” But is that actually possible? Research shows that 99% of our behaviors are influenced by our unconscious mind, hidden from our view, whether intentional or not. Even “good people” subconsciously generate assumptions of a person’s competence, education, class, status, and values based on their perceived race, gender, age, and audiological status. These assumptions lead to implicit biases, which significantly impact how we interact with society including our peers, superiors, consumers, and stakeholders.

      This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) and Power, Privilege, and Oppression (PPO) and is presented at the Some Knowledge level. 

      We’ve all heard the saying, “don’t judge a book by its cover.” But is that actually possible? Research shows that 99% of our behaviors are influenced by our unconscious mind, hidden from our view, whether intentional or not. Even “good people” subconsciously generate assumptions of a person’s competence, education, class, status, and values based on their perceived race, gender, age, and audiological status. These assumptions lead to implicit biases, which significantly impact how we interact with society including our peers, superiors, consumers, and stakeholders.

      Even though no one is exempt from the pitfalls of implicit bias, we can make a concerted effort to align our behaviors with our intentions. In this interactive discussion, we will address implicit bias through research-based data as well as a narrative and social cognitive lens. I look forward to an open dialogue that shines a light on these hidden biases and strengthens our communities.

      Target Audience: Professionals working within the ASL community

      image
      imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
      imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
      imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members.
      RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.

      1) Explain the cognitive processes that cause implicit bias which influence behaviors.

      2) Recognize the impact implicit bias has on the ASL community. 

      3) Perform self-assessments to uncover their own hidden biases.

      4) Formulate strategies to strengthen the alignment of their behaviors with intentions and minimize biases influence.

      The webinar platform that will be used is GoToTraining. Please make sure to read the information below to ensure easy webinar access.



      Click on the links below for more information

      Download GoToTraining Now

      I Can't Join my Session

      Register for a Session

      System Requirements for Attendees

      Why Isn't the Download Working

      Sarah Brown

      CI/CT, BEI Master

      Over 24 years experience as a certified interpreter
      Currently working as an access coordinator, making NDC's work and media accessible!
      BEI Master and RID CI and CT
      BA in Human Resources Counseling with the Deaf; Interpreting minor
      Interpreted in a wide array of settings: high-stakes executive business meetings, medical appointments, job training, technical workplace, staff meetings, interviews, platform interpreting, film projects, conferences, mental health counseling, education and more.

      About me:
      I can hardly believe that I've surpassed my 24th year interpreting! As a child, I watched my hearing parents interacting with the Deaf community in Arkansas.

      Attending East Central University proved to be a perfect move for me. I was immersed in American Sign Language within the amazing community near the Oklahoma School for the Deaf and earned my bachelor’s degree in Human Resources Counseling for the Deaf with a minor in interpreting.

      I've been married to my husband, a deaf business owner and tech geek, since 1997, and am a mom to 5 kids, including 3 hearing kids and a hard-of-hearing son and deaf son who both attend Texas School for the Deaf.

      While still a student, I was first certified by the state of Oklahoma in 1995. I went on to receive the highest certification awarded in that state, as well as an NAD Level IV within my first 4 years of interpreting professionally. In 2001, I earned both my Certificate of Interpretation and Certificate of Transliteration (CI/CT) from the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID). In 2016, I finally tipped my hat to the state I now call home and received a Master level certificate from the Board of Evaluation of Interpreters (BEI).

      While I still do some VRI and community work, I am now full time at the National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes, coordinating access, from arranging access providers to coordinating voiceovers and captions for video content.

      .