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  • VR as a System

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar builds on the Systems Thinking for Interpreters webinar by exploring VR as a System. The VR structure will be discussed so that its individual and the inter-connectedness of the parts are understood. This understanding can help interpreters to understand the context in which their work occurs and thus make more informed decisions regarding meaning, acts and practices.

    This webinar builds on the Systems Thinking for Interpreters webinar by exploring VR as a System.  The VR structure will be discussed so that its individual and the inter-connectedness of the parts are understood.  This understanding can help interpreters to understand the context in which their work occurs and thus make more informed decisions regarding meaning, acts and practices. 

  • Skills, Knowledge and Attributes of Interpreters Working in VR Settings

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Through a review of the literature, expert consultation and collection of data from practitioners and VR professionals, a set of domains and competencies of interpreters working in the VR setting has been defined. This webinar will introduce the domains and competencies of interpreters who work in the VR setting and consider ways in which competencies can be developed.

    Through a review of the literature, expert consultation and collection of data from practitioners and VR professionals, a set of domains and competencies of interpreters working in the VR setting has been defined.  This webinar will introduce the domains and competencies of interpreters who work in the VR setting and consider ways in which competencies can be developed.

  • Social Justice Roundtable

    Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The Social Justice Roundtable promotes participants to engage in meaningful exchanges around anti-oppression and social justice issues as they relate to the working and living experience of interpreters and those they serve. The forum serves to support those who are members of marginalized groups and to educate participants on issues of oppression, discrimination, and social justice. Participants will have opportunities participant in discussions, network with others, and learn from current events.

    The Social Justice Roundtable promotes participants to engage in meaningful exchanges around anti-oppression and social justice issues as they relate to the working and living experience of interpreters and those they serve. The forum serves to support those who are members of marginalized groups and to educate participants on issues of oppression, discrimination, and social justice. Participants will have opportunities participant in discussions, network with others, and learn from current events. We acknowledge that there is room for improvement both culturally and structurally within our society, we value involvement of people of diverse backgrounds within our field. The Social Justice Forum hopes to facilitate political and social awareness, gather varied perspectives, pass on positive images of discussions, and make the interpreting field more inclusive for future professionals.

    Joseph Hill

    Dave Coyne

  • Strategies for Exploring the Complexities of Ethical Decision Making for Students

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Circle Processes are an important part of many cultures and indigenous populations around the world and are used as a means for collective decision making, community sharing and dispute resolution. Elements of Circle Processes are also used in parts of our society as a way to build community, resolve conflict, and reach consensus. The Circle is a non-hierarchical, shared space, developed by its participants and is used as a means to share information and learn of others’ perspectives and beliefs in safe, non-threatening manner. The purpose of this webinar is to provide a forum to learn about Circles and how to facilitate Circle Processes as a way to discuss and analyze various components of ethics and decision making.

    Circle Processes are an important part of many cultures and indigenous populations around the world and are used as a means for collective decision making, community sharing and dispute resolution. Elements of Circle Processes are also used in parts of our society as a way to build community, resolve conflict, and reach consensus. The Circle is a non-hierarchical, shared space, developed by its participants and is used as a means to share information and learn of others’ perspectives and beliefs in safe, non-threatening manner. The purpose of this webinar is to provide a forum to learn about Circles and how to facilitate Circle Processes as a way to discuss and analyze various components of ethics and decision making. Insights from a variety of perspectives including research on conflict in interpreting, conflict theory, communications and professional guides such as the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct will all be a part of this discussion. Participants will be introduced to concepts of Circle Processes including the format of Circles, the role and function of Circle Keepers, and strategies to utilize this process with students and colleagues to unpack and discuss case studies explore ethical decision making. 

  • Strategies on Infusing Deaf-Blind Related Content into the IEP Curriculum – A Share Shop Amongst Instructors

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​It is the intention of Interpreter Education Programs to prepare well-rounded, knowledgeable and skilled practitioners. Yet we are doing them a disservice by not providing adequate exposure and experiences specific to deaf-blind interpreting strategies. A recent survey conducted by the National Task Force on Deaf-Blind Interpreting & the National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers validated this concern as many instructors reported a lack of the requisite content knowledge and skills that are needed to teach deaf-blind content. This online webinar will provide a platform for the sharing of resources amongst IEP instructors on content, activities and materials that are available.

    It is the intention of Interpreter Education Programs to prepare well-rounded, knowledgeable and skilled practitioners. Yet we are doing them a disservice by not providing adequate exposure and experiences specific to deaf-blind interpreting strategies. A recent survey conducted by the National Task Force on Deaf-Blind Interpreting & the National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers validated this concern as many instructors reported a lack of the requisite content knowledge and skills that are needed to teach deaf-blind content. This online webinar will provide a platform for the sharing of resources amongst IEP instructors on content, activities and materials that are available. Content will be shared from the national survey of interpreter educators, examples of content that should be incorporated and activities for inclusion into the IEP will be suggested. IEP instructors will be asked to share their own ideas and suggestions to their colleagues.

  • It Takes A Village … Taking a Closer Look at Interpreter Education and Community Capacity

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Interpreting is a profession born of the community. As interpreter education programs have moved to academia and the academic bar continues to raise, the challenge facing programs and faculty is in finding “the zone” – that sweet spot that balances academia and the real-life learning that can only happen through community involvement. Interpreting students will often take the knowledge they learn into the community via observations, volunteer work, service learning, internships and other activities.

    Interpreting is a profession born of the community. As interpreter education programs have moved to academia and the academic bar continues to raise, the challenge facing programs and faculty is in finding “the zone” – that sweet spot that balances academia and the real-life learning that can only happen through community involvement. Interpreting students will often take the knowledge they learn into the community via observations, volunteer work, service learning, internships and other activities. Members of the Deaf Community are a vital, necessary part of this mix. Programs must have internship sites that have experienced strong interpreter supervisors to oversee student work.  Community involvement and resources are necessary for program and student success. At the same time, more and more community members and internship sites are saying “thanks, but no thanks.” “We’d love to help, but we can’t this time.” “We are already working with students from other programs, we can’t do more.” “How does this (hosting an intern/volunteering for the program) benefit me?”  This webinar will begin to explore the idea of community capacity with program directors from interpreter education programs across the country.

  • Leadership: Influencing Organizational Change

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Receive a 15% discount when you register and enter the “LEAD2019” code. Discount ends on August 31, 2019. Volunteer leaders are the cornerstone of RID and can be found at every level of the organization—affiliate chapters, member sections, committees, councils, task forces, and the national board. What are strategies and approaches that can be used by these leaders to influence organizational change in each level? This presentation will explore the use of role and self, and the distinction between adaptive and technical work, in influencing organizational change.

    Volunteer leaders are the cornerstone of RID and can be found at every level of the organization—affiliate chapters, member sections, committees, councils, task forces, and the national board. What are strategies and approaches that can be used by these leaders to influence organizational change in each level? This presentation will explore the use of role and self, and the distinction between adaptive and technical work, in influencing organizational change. Following this presentation, participants will engage in facilitated small group discussion to apply the information provided to volunteer leadership roles within RID. The discussion will also determine recommendations for influencing organizational change at RID.

  • Learning from Organizational Life Cycles

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​All organizations go through life cycles. This presentation will explore aspects of organizational assessment (including life cycles) and their application to RID. Following this presentation, participants will engage in facilitated small group discussions to apply the key points of this presentation to the experience of RID members at the local, state, and national level. The facilitated group discussions will also consider what strategic recommendations can help to transform RID into a more relevant organization, responsive to the current needs of membership and stakeholders.

    All organizations go through life cycles. This presentation will explore aspects of organizational assessment (including life cycles) and their application to RID. Following this presentation, participants will engage in facilitated small group discussions to apply the key points of this presentation to the experience of RID members at the local, state, and national level. The facilitated group discussions will also consider what strategic recommendations can help to transform RID into a more relevant organization, responsive to the current needs of membership and stakeholders.

  • Legal Interpreting Basics

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Legal settings constitute high risk interpreting. Many interpreters avoid legal interpreting because of the fear that they might do more harm than good if they interpret in a legal setting without the proper training and credentials. This seminar aims to assist generalist interpreters understand the path to legal interpreting, the type of skills and competencies necessary and the support available from the legal interpreting community. Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting nation-wide.

    Legal settings constitute high risk interpreting. Many interpreters avoid legal interpreting because of the fear that they might do more harm than good if they interpret in a legal setting without the proper training and credentials. This seminar aims to assist generalist interpreters understand the path to legal interpreting, the type of skills and competencies necessary and the support available from the legal interpreting community.

    Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting nation-wide

  • Navigating Leadership Within RID at the State, Regional and National Level

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    What does it mean to be a volunteer leader within RID at the local, state and national level? Leaders from various leadership roles from within RID will share their leadership journey, lessons learned, and strategies they offer to other individuals currently serving or aspiring to serve as a volunteer leader. Panelists for this discussion will be Dawn Duran, Scott Huffman, Billieanne McLellan, Lewis Merkin, and Dawn Whitcher.

    What does it mean to be a volunteer leader within RID at the local, state and national level? Leaders from various leadership roles from within RID will share their leadership journey, lessons learned, and strategies they offer to other individuals currently serving or aspiring to serve as a volunteer leader. Panelists for this discussion will be Dawn Duran, Scott Huffman, Billieanne McLellan, Lewis Merkin, and Dawn Whitcher.