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  • Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/20/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    This activity has been approved for 0.2 RID Professional Studies CEUs. Happy Women’s History Month! Join us on Wednesday, March 20th at 1pm EST to celebrate women and learn how we can build one another up in the Deaf and interpreting worlds. This engaging webinar will discuss iconic figures in women’s history, touch on the experiences of women developing Alopecia and PCOS, address challenges Deaf women may face, allow for discussion of various approaches to removing barriers black Deaf women can encounter with non-BIPOC interpreters.

    Happy Women’s History Month! Join us on Wednesday, March 20th at 1pm EST to celebrate women and learn how we can build one another up in the Deaf and interpreting worlds. This engaging webinar will discuss iconic figures in women’s history, touch on the experiences of women developing Alopecia and PCOS, address challenges Deaf women may face, allow for discussion of various approaches to removing barriers black Deaf women can encounter with non-BIPOC interpreters.

    This activity is approved for 0.2 RID Professional Studies CEUs.

    Tempest Cooper

    Tempest Cooper, MSW, ASW

    Hello beautiful people! My name is Tempest Cooper, a proud Black deaf mom to a one-year-old son and happily married to my amazing husband, who's a fantastic father. Motherhood is my joy. As the CEO of Oya Reigns LLC, I craft organic soaps, bath bombs, and scrubs from scratch. Balancing entrepreneurship, I also serve as a Clinical Case Manager/ASL Deaf Therapist at Deaf Community Counseling Services at Felton in California, empowering deaf individuals with their mental health. I am a Deaf artist, Member of Zeta Phi Beta Incorporated, Motivational Speaker, and after-school teacher for Black American Sign Language. I had the honor of being Miss Deaf US 2018-2019 on an international level, went to Russia and won third place. Culture Attired and currently serve as Vice President of Bay Area Black Deaf Advocates (BABDA) 2023-2025. I was accepted into Tulane University as a PhD candidate as a Social worker. Graceful of this journey!

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/28/2024 at 8:30 PM (EST)

    This activity has been approved for 0.15 RID Professional Studies CEUs. RID has awarded 27 different credentials since its inception in 1964. The confusing morass of alphabet soup acronyms has left most everyone unsure of what various credentials mean. Come join the Certification Committee in parsing through the history of RID credentials and be the first to offer feedback on a new approach for what interpreters can and should call themselves depending on which credentials they hold.

    RID has awarded 27 different credentials since its inception in 1964. The confusing morass of alphabet soup acronyms has left most everyone unsure of what various credentials mean. Come join the Certification Committee in parsing through the history of RID credentials and be the first to offer feedback on a new approach for what interpreters can and should call themselves depending on which credentials they hold.

    This activity is approved for 0.15 RID Professional Studies CEUs.

    Andrea K Smith

    Andrea K Smith, MA, CI/CT, SC:L, NIC

    Andrea K Smith has been interpreting for over twenty years with a practice that has been primarily rooted in legal and scientific/technical fields. She currently serves as a designated interpreter on staff with the national ACLU Disability Rights Program supporting a Deaf attorney and numerous litigation and advocacy projects focused on the Deaf community.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This activity has been approved for 0.2 RID Professional Studies CEUs. This workshop will review the research on the history and structure of Black ASL and discuss where an awareness of language varieties and dialects fits into the interpretation process. This workshop fits squarely into the area of language and cultural development and into the exploration and expansion of language and cultural repertoires. Following the review of the research and the viewing of the documentary on Black ASL - Signing Black in America - the workshop participants will be divided into groups and asked to discuss questions concerning the relationship between language varieties and interpreting. The groups will then be brought back together to share their findings and participate in a general discussion and Q & A. The workshop will last ninety minutes. The questions and the discussion will deal with what it means for interpreters to use Black ASL and how interpreters know when to use African American English. With Black ASL as the foundation and the starting point, perspectives on the varieties of other languages, both spoken and signed, such as Spanish and French will be welcome. The workshop will be interactive and will engage and elevate the discourse around interpreting for Black Deaf consumers and consumers whose repertoires include varieties of Spanish, French, and other languages. In addition to working interpreters and students of interpreters, it will benefit teachers, counselors, and professionals in the field of interpreting.

    This workshop will review the research on the history and structure of Black ASL and discuss where an awareness of language varieties and dialects fits into the interpretation process. This workshop fits squarely into the area of language and cultural development and into the exploration and expansion of language and cultural repertoires. Following the review of the research and the viewing of the documentary on Black ASL - Signing Black in America - the workshop participants will be divided into groups and asked to discuss questions concerning the relationship between language varieties and interpreting. The groups will then be brought back together to share their findings and participate in a general discussion and Q & A. The workshop will last ninety minutes. The questions and the discussion will deal with what it means for interpreters to use Black ASL and how interpreters know when to use African American English. With Black ASL as the foundation and the starting point, perspectives on the varieties of other languages, both spoken and signed, such as Spanish and French will be welcome. The workshop will be interactive and will engage and elevate the discourse around interpreting for Black Deaf consumers and consumers whose repertoires include varieties of Spanish, French, and other languages. In addition to working interpreters and students of interpreters, it will benefit teachers, counselors, and professionals in the field of interpreting.

    This activity has been approved for 0.2 RID Professional Studies CEUs.

    Dr. Carolyn McCaskill

    Dr. Carolyn McCaskill

    A graduate of the Alabama School for the Deaf in Talladega, Alabama. In 1977, she completed a BA degree in Psychology with a minor in Social Work, and a MA degree in Counseling of the Deaf in 1979 both from Gallaudet (College) University. From 1979-1996, Dr. McCaskill has held several positions as a residence and high school counselor at the Model Secondary School for the Deaf and a counselor at the Houston Community College System. She was also a career counselor at the Gallaudet University and Coordinator of Minority Achievement and Multicultural Program for Pre-college Programs at Gallaudet University. She is currently a Professor in the ASL & Deaf Studies Department at Gallaudet University and has been teaching since 1996. Carolyn has conducted numerous seminars and workshops related to multicultural issues in the Deaf community, and Black Deaf history community, and culture. Dr. McCaskill is a recipient of the Thomas and Julia Mayes Award 2005. She also was selected as a Diversity Fellows in the Provost office in 2006. Dr. McCaskill is a co-author of "The Hidden Treasure of Black ASL" published in 2011. Dr. McCaskill received the Deaf Humanitarian Award from the National Action Network (NAN), one of the nation’s leading civil rights organizations, at the House of Justice Deaf Humanitarian Awards Banquet on February 2, 2013 in New York City. At the awards banquet, Dr. McCaskill also became the first deaf recipient of the Key to Harlem. NAN was founded by civil rights leader Reverend Al Sharpton, who serves as the organization’s president.

    In addition, Dr. McCaskill was given citations for excellence and achievement from New York State Senator Bill Perkins, New York State Assemblyman Keith L. T. Wright, and New York City Council Member Inez E. Dickens.

    In honor of Black History Month, Dr. McCaskill is included in theGrio’s 100, an annual list of the top 100 influential people in the African American community, compiled by TheGrio.com, a division of NBC News that focuses on stories and perspectives of interest to African Americans. She was named in the Education category for 2013 for a book she co-authored, The Hidden Treasure of Black ASL, which explores the evolution of ASL within the black community.

    Joseph Hill

    Dr. Joseph C. Hill is an Associate Professor in the Department of ASL and Interpreting Education, Associate Director of the Center on Culture and Language, and Assistant Dean for Faculty Recruitment and Retention at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institutes for the Deaf. His research interests are the socio-historical and -linguistic aspects of Black American Sign Language and the American Deaf community’s attitudes and ideologies about existing signing varieties. His contributions include The Hidden Treasure of Black ASL: Its History and Structure (2011) which he co-authored with Carolyn McCaskill, Ceil Lucas, and Robert Bayley and Language Attitudes in the American Deaf Community (2012). He is also one of the associate producers for the documentary, Signing Black in America, produced by the Language & Life Project at the North Carolina State University. Link: www.josephchill.com

    Dr. Ceil Lucas

    Dr. Ceil Lucas, Gallaudet University

    Ceil Lucas is Professor Emerita of Linguistics at Gallaudet University and editor of the journal Sign Language Studies. She has conducted extensive sociolinguistic research on American Sign Language (ASL) as well as research on African American English. Her books include Sociolinguistic Variation in American Sign Language (with Robert Bayley and Clayton Valli), The Linguistics of American Sign Language, 5th edition (with Clayton Valli, Kristen Mulrooney, and Miako Villanueva), and The Hidden Treasure of Black ASL: Its History and Structure (with Carolyn McCaskill, Robert Bayley, and Joseph Hill). She is an associate producer for the documentary Signing Black in America, with Carolyn McCaskill and Joseph Hill ( produced by the Language & Life Project, North Carolina State University ).

    Dr. Robert Bayley

    Robert Bayley is Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at UC Davis and an associate member of the Centre for Research on Language Contact at York University in Toronto. His research focuses on language variation and language socialization, especially in bilingual and second language populations. Professor Bayley is the author of more than 150 publications, including 16 co- authored and co-edited volumes and articles in major journals such as American Speech, Asia-Pacific Language Variation, Language, Language Variation and Change, and Studies in Second Language Acquisition. Currently he is conducting research on the acquisition of sociolinguistic competence by second language learners and, with Kristen Kennedy Terry, working on a book on social network analysis for second language acquisition research.

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This workshop is 0.25 CEUs in the category of General Studies (GS) and is presented at the Some Knowledge level. This webinar is designed for professionals who work with the Deaf community: CDI's, Hearing Interpreters, Deaf Ed paraprofessionals, as well as instructors. Health literacy is a broad domain that encompasses knowledge most people glean through incidental learning. The United States in particular provides very little direct K-12 instruction in sexual health as it is rooted in sociopolitical taboo. Yet, sexual health is vital for mental health, physical health, relationships, and child-rearing -- all arenas that are significant contributions to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Here, we explore how this limited form of literacy for Deaf and hearing people impacts access to communication, understanding, and the promotion of public health literacy. We will walk through data-driven information based on what we know of literacy, what has been found in terms of sexual health literacy, and how we can steer both populations towards the overarching goal of public health literacy and advocacy. *This recording is a bit lagging for the beginning ten minutes. Thank you for your patience as you view this webinar.*

    This seminar is designed for professionals who work with the Deaf community: CDI's, Hearing Interpreters, Deaf Ed paraprofessionals, as well as instructors. Health literacy is a broad domain that encompasses knowledge most people glean through incidental learning. The United States in particular provides very little direct K-12 instruction in sexual health as it is rooted in sociopolitical taboo. Yet, sexual health is vital for mental health, physical health, relationships, and child-rearing -- all arenas that are significant contributions to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Here, we explore how this limited form of literacy for Deaf and hearing people impacts access to communication, understanding, and the promotion of public health literacy. We will walk through data-driven information based on what we know of literacy, what has been found in terms of sexual health literacy, and how we can steer both populations towards the overarching goal of public health literacy and advocacy.

    This activity has been approved for 0.25 General Studies RID CEUs.

    *This recording is a bit lagging for the beginning ten minutes. Thank you for your patience as you view this webinar.*

    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.

    Participants of this workshop will be able to: 

    1. identify status-quo literacy levels in Deaf and hearing communities,

    2. be able to articulate the current barriers of sexual health access, and

    3. identify and articulate gaps in learning systems that prevent succession.

    Dr. S. Jordan Wright

    Dr. S. Jordan Wright, Ph.D. (he/him/his)

    Dr. Wright is a Critical Theorist, Health researcher, and director of the Deaf MetaLiteracy lab at Rochester Institute of Technology's National Technical Institute for the Deaf. The Deaf MetaLiteracy Lab is housed within The Deaf Biomedical Science and Healthcare Hub, which focuses on three strands of inquiry: Health Literacy, Digital Literacy, and Cultural Literacy as they interact with the lives of Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled, and Hard of Hearing individuals. Dr. Wright has a strong interest in the intersectional experience of health and technology within the Deaf LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC communities, and presently runs three studies in the arena of sexual health. As a professor of Deaf Studies and literacy, Dr. Wright is a firm believer of bringing research to the classroom which allows students to engage in the world around them beyond the constructs of pedagogical theory. In his free time, Dr. Wright enjoys traveling, is an avid reader, and dad to two fur babies: Savior and Omega.

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar is 0.25 Professional Studies CEUs and is presented at the Little/None Knowledge level. Suicide is a topic that we aren’t comfortable talking about until we have to. It is a reality that does not discriminate; it doesn’t care who you are or what you do, it can affect anyone. Presented by an interpreter & sibling suicide loss survivor, this workshop will be an open honest conversation about what interpreters need to know about suicide: the facts, statistics, appropriate language (ASL & English), warning signs, risk factors, terminology, myths, and prevention. We will also talk about strategies for safely and effectively working with suicide loss survivors, attempt survivors, and individuals calling the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline. Let’s talk.

    Suicide is a topic that we aren’t comfortable talking about until we have to. It is a reality that does not discriminate; it doesn’t care who you are or what you do, it can affect anyone. Presented by an interpreter & sibling suicide loss survivor, this workshop will be an open honest conversation about what interpreters need to know about suicide: the facts, statistics, appropriate language (ASL & English), warning signs, risk factors, terminology, myths, and prevention. We will also talk about strategies for safely and effectively working with suicide loss survivors, attempt survivors, and individuals calling the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline. Let’s talk.


    This activity has been approved for 0.25 Professional Studies RID CEUs.

    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.

    1. Participants will identify various warning signs, risk factors, and protective factors for suicide,
    2. Participants will discuss current trends and statistics related to suicide and how this might impact the work they do,
    3. Participants will review common terminology related to suicide and discuss how it is accurate or inaccurate for the situation (in ASL and English),
    4. Participants will discuss strategies for safely and effectively working with suicide loss survivors, attempt survivors, and individuals calling the 988 Suicide Crisis Lifeline.

    Tarra Grammenos

    Tarra Grammenos, M.S., SC:L, NIC Advanced (she/her)

    Tarra Grammenos, M.S., SC:L, NIC Advanced, holds a Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice, Graduate Certificate in Legal Interpreting, Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology of Deviance, and Associates Degree in American Sign Language /English Interpreting. Born and raised in Minnesota, Tarra has been an ASL/English interpreter for 15+ years. Since the death of her youngest brother to suicide in 2017, Tarra has immersed herself into the field of suicidology, attends monthly suicide survivor support groups, Out of the Darkness walks, and even hosts an ASL event for the Annual International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day. She’s also been heavily involved with her local MRID chapter as previous president, conference chair, and various committees. She resides in Minnesota with her partner, Patrick and their adorable chihuahua, Junior.

  • Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar is 0.3 Professional Studies-Legal CEUs and is presented at the Some Knowledge level. Deaf people navigating the legal system may, depending on their primary method of communication, rely on the conduit of interpretation. This session, facilitated by a Deaf attorney and a legal interpreter, will explore views on the ways interpreters can improve the process for Deaf people attempting to access the legal system. Using curated clips from interviews with deaf and hearing attorneys and professionals working with deaf clients in legal contexts; we will explore what these practitioners wish interpreters knew to be more effective.

    Deaf people navigating the legal system may, depending on their primary method of communication, rely on the conduit of interpretation. This session, facilitated by a Deaf attorney and a legal interpreter, will explore views on the ways interpreters can improve the process for Deaf people attempting to access the legal system. Using curated clips from interviews with deaf and hearing attorneys and professionals working with deaf clients in legal contexts; we will explore what these practitioners wish interpreters knew to be more effective.

    This activity has been approved for 0.3 Professional Studies-Legal RID CEUs.

    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.

    After this 3-hour session on working with legal professionals, participants will be able to:

    1. Articulate at least three ways that legal professionals wish interpreters would adjust their practice to meet the needs of their consumers
    2. Critique various commonplace practices in interpreting that are at odds with the goals of legal professionals
    3. Identify the differences between criminal law, civil law, movement lawyering, and integrated advocacy

    Andrea K Smith

    Andrea K Smith, MA, CI/CT, SC:L, NIC

    Andrea K Smith has been interpreting for over twenty years with a practice that has been primarily rooted in legal and scientific/technical fields. She currently serves as a designated interpreter on staff with the national ACLU Disability Rights Program supporting a Deaf attorney and numerous litigation and advocacy projects focused on the Deaf community.

    West Resendes, JD (he/him)

    West Resendes, JD (he/him)

    West Resendes is a Staff Attorney in the Disability Rights Program and Policy Counsel in the National Political Advocacy Department, where he uses disability rights litigation and community-centered advocacy tools to advance the ACLU’s affirmative vision for reducing the role, power, presence, and responsibilities of police in schools and communities. Among other efforts, West is engaged in ongoing litigation to reform the statewide carceral and parole systems in Georgia for deaf and hard of hearing people. West is the first culturally deaf person to work at the ACLU since its co-founder, Helen Keller, and sits on the ACLU’s Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Council. Prior to joining the ACLU, West earned his J.D. at Yale Law School.

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) and is presented at the Some Knowledge level. This presentation explores the lived experience of a Black CODA and the various cultural intersections that defines her identity. The workshop will also examine her journey to becoming a professional interpreter and how the path can be made easier for the next generation.

    This presentation explores the lived experience of a Black CODA and the various cultural intersections that defines her identity. The workshop will also examine her journey to becoming a professional interpreter and how the path can be made easier for the next generation.

    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.

    •Participants will be exposed to the impact of culture on the formation of identity for Black CODAS and also how culture plays a role in a Black interpreter’s signing and processing.

    •Participants will be able to identify differences between IEP educators perspectives of constructive criticism vs. racial microaggressions.

    •Attendees will be able to identify several challenges faced by Black CODAs working in the profession.

    •Participants will gain tools to begin the groundwork for working with Black CODAS as “allies” and in mentorship settings.

    Amber Robinson (Moderator)

    Amber Robinson is an Black Nationally Certified interpreter, ASL performer, and social media
    content creator who lives in Birmingham, Alabama. Raised in Talladega, Alabama, she is the
    proud daughter of Black Deaf parents who gave her the freedom to create her own story and
    the strength to continue the legacy of her Deaf and hearing family members.
    She graduated Magna Cum Laude from the Troy University Interpreter Training Program. While
    in this program, she noticed the lack of diversity and representation in the interpreting field in
    Alabama and developed a passion for bringing more awareness to the skills and talents of Black
    interpreters. Also, during her time at Troy, Amber was able to develop a collaborative
    partnership with the Troy University Department of Theatre and Dance for the production of
    “Once On This Island” in 2017. The production, that predominantly featured minorities,
    showcased the talents of Black interpreters and celebrated the usage of ASL within the creative
    world.
    Amber is currently an educational interpreter for K-5 students within inner city schools. She
    strives to be a role model to those aspiring to be a part of the ASL community through
    interpreting, as well as to the students she interprets for. As a community interpreter, Amber has
    participated in and interpreted several social justice events (i.e. Black Lives Matter protests)
    where she demonstrated her role as a trailblazer for the representation of ASL. As one of very
    few Black interpreters in the State of Alabama, Amber has raised awareness regarding what
    Black interpreters face in the field and community each and every day through music, dance,
    and performances - both live and on various social media platforms. Amber has been
    recognized for her journey as a Black CODA Interpreter in Buzzfeed, RID Views, and various
    other platforms.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) and is presented at the Little to None Knowledge level. Stakeholder Panel ~ All of us are stakeholders of RID, but some are positioned in unique ways that allow them to serve as bridges — Bridges to other organizations, bridges to various communities, and bridges to our past and future. Participants in this session will have the opportunity to see a facilitated dialogue by Treasurer Yakata Nichols on how some stakeholders view RID in terms of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, in light of unpacking our relationship to audism, our current process of transformation, and what it means to transition into an organization that more fully aligns itself with our mission and vision.

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) and is presented at the Little to None Knowledge level.

    Attendees will glean an understanding of the recent work of the Certification Committee, its charge and scope, findings, and how the Committee considers audism, racism, and other -isms when carrying out their charge.To achieve the Committee’s recommendations on pursuing independent accreditation for it’s certification program, it is required that RID transition into a Professional Certifying Organization  A representative from the NCCA will outline the NCCA accreditation process, pre-requisites and ongoing maintenance of the credential. Finally, participants will be asked to engage in thoughtful discussion about the current barriers and -isms to accessing Certification and identify measurable strategies to overcome or dismantle such systemic barriers.

    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members.
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.
  • Product not yet rated Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) - Legal and is presented at the Little to None Knowledge level. Participants will explore minimum standards for legal/court credentialing within a professional certification organization. A review of the necessary elements of credentialing as RID transitions forward will be provided. Discussions and presentations will focus on the elements of equity and access to training, specifically for entry level opportunities for BIPOC and Deaf interpreters. Project CLIMB will explore audism, racism, within the legal justice system and how it affects entry to practice for BIPOC and Deaf interpreters. Participants will explore the proposed portfolio approach as designed by the RID Legal Credentialing Task Force as well as have the opportunity to engage in lively group discussions led by LIMS.

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) - Legal and is presented at the Little to None Knowledge level.

    Participants will explore minimum standards for legal/court credentialing within a professional certification organization.  A review of the necessary elements of credentialing as RID transitions forward will be provided. Discussions and presentations will focus on the elements of equity and access to training, specifically for entry level opportunities for BIPOC and Deaf interpreters. Project CLIMB will explore audism, racism, within the legal justice system and how it affects entry to practice for BIPOC and Deaf interpreters. Participants will explore the proposed portfolio approach as designed by the RID Legal Credentialing Task Force as well as have the opportunity to engage in lively group discussions led by LIMS. 

    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members.
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.
  • Product not yet rated Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) - Power, Privilege, and Oppression (PPO) and is presented at the Little to None Knowledge level. Contextually, we have been through a whirlwind of various leadership styles and approaches over the last several years- from our government at the macro level to our national organization at the mezzo level, and our affiliate chapters at the micro level. What ways can organizations model responsive leadership? What does responsive leadership entail in terms of action? In this session, Shana, Traci, and Christopher will share what it takes to engage in responsive leadership, and what we might do to elicit our innate and given abilities to engage one another out of inaction and into action.

    This webinar is 0.2 CEUs in the category of Professional Studies (PS) - Power, Privilege, and Oppression (PPO) and is presented at the Little to None Knowledge level.

    Contextually, we have been through a whirlwind of various leadership styles and approaches over the last several years- from our government at the macro level to our national organization at the mezzo level, and our affiliate chapters at the micro level. What ways can organizations model responsive leadership?  What does responsive leadership entail in terms of action? In this session, Shana, Traci, and Christopher will share what it takes to engage in responsive leadership, and what we might do to elicit our innate and given abilities to engage one another out of inaction and into action.

    image
    imageRequests for reasonable accommodations can be made by emailing webinars@rid.org
    imageRefund and Cancellation Policy: No refunds will be issued for cancellations
    imageThis webinar will be recorded and will be available for future viewing by RID members.
    RID is providing this workshop as an opportunity for safe, respectful learning and will not permit harassment, discrimination or horizontal violence based on another's comments, questions, schema, race, color, religion, gender, gender expression, age, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation or any other protected class.