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  • DC-S and the Dialogic Work Analysis - Part II

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The first two webinars in this four part series introduced viewers to the theoretical framework of Demand-Control Schema (DC-S) and how to discuss interpreting demands/controls using a paradigm of teleological ethics. This included an explanation of demand constellations, consequences and professional values. Some viewers then participated in two online learning communities were they continued to learn about demand-control analyses. The third webinar puts all the DC-S constructs together (identifying and articulating demands, controls, and consequences and their relationship to professional values and professional responsibility) by using sample cases and situated practice examples to highlight how these DC-S constructs are used to analyze interpreting cases. Note: This webinar series is taught with the assumption that viewers have the information from each previous webinar and online learning community.

    The first two webinars in this four part series introduced viewers to the theoretical framework of Demand-Control Schema (DC-S) and how to discuss interpreting demands/controls using a paradigm of teleological ethics. This included an explanation of demand constellations, consequences and professional values. Some viewers then participated in two online learning communities were they continued to learn about demand-control analyses. The third webinar puts all the DC-S constructs together (identifying and articulating demands, controls, and consequences and their relationship to professional values and professional responsibility) by using sample cases and situated practice examples to highlight how these DC-S constructs are used to analyze interpreting cases. Note: This webinar series is taught with the assumption that viewers have the information from each previous webinar and online learning community.

  • Deaf Interpreters within the VR System

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Deaf interpreters bring a unique set of skills and experiences to the interpreted events—particularly when providing services to deaf individuals with unique linguistic considerations. This webinar will focus on the contributions of Deaf interpreters within the VR system. Samples of Deaf interpreters in action will be provided and discussed. Strategies for enhancing Deaf-hearing interpreter teams will also be explored.

    Deaf interpreters bring a unique set of skills and experiences to the interpreted events—particularly when providing services to deaf individuals with unique linguistic considerations.  This webinar will focus on the contributions of Deaf interpreters within the VR system. Samples of Deaf interpreters in action will be provided and discussed.  Strategies for enhancing Deaf-hearing interpreter teams will also be explored.

  • Deaf VR Professionals and Designated Interpreters

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The importance of access and inclusion for the 24/Deaf Professional within their work environment requires that interpreters consider alternative models for how they approach their work. This webinar will focus on the Deaf VR Professional and Designated Interpreter Model by examining how it contributes to the fuller participation of the Deaf Professional within their work context. As well, some of the unique considerations and practices employed by interpreters using this model will be discussed.

    The importance of access and inclusion for the 24/Deaf Professional within their work environment requires that interpreters consider alternative models for how they approach their work. This webinar will focus on the Deaf VR Professional and Designated Interpreter Model by examining how it contributes to the fuller participation of the Deaf Professional within their work context.  As well, some of the unique considerations and practices employed by interpreters using this model will be discussed.

  • Demystifying Professional versus General Studies, When Specialization is Becoming Ever More Important

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​The RID Certification Maintenance (CMP) and Associate Continuing Education Tracking (ACET) Programs were developed with flexibility in mind. When these programs were developed, it was recognized that RID was a young organization and the field and science of interpreting was still developing. The authors for the CMP/ACET programs wanted to include a way for interpreters to demonstrate their currency in the field (as part of any credential maintenance program) and that might still allow for new and innovative information to be brought into the field. Creating a General Studies area allowed RID members to explore information that did not have an immediate relevance to interpreting.

    The RID Certification Maintenance (CMP) and Associate Continuing Education Tracking (ACET) Programs were developed with flexibility in mind.  When these programs were developed, it was recognized that RID was a young organization and the field and science of interpreting was still developing.  The authors for the CMP/ACET programs wanted to include a way for interpreters to demonstrate their currency in the field (as part of any credential maintenance program) and that might still allow for new and innovative information to be brought into the field.  Creating a General Studies area allowed RID members to explore information that did not have an immediate relevance to interpreting.  It also provided a mechanism for interpreters to explore studies of topics they may seek to interpret in the future, thereby building a solid base of background and understanding for the topic.  This webinar will explore the distinctions between RID’s Professional Studies category and that of General Studies.  We will seek to help participants know how to better advise certified interpreters in documenting their educational endeavors and in making connections between what is or is not a Professional Studies pursuit.

  • Designing Effective Online Educational Programs

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    When the RID Certification Maintenance Program was first launched in 1985 the only distance learning was attending conferences or conventions. Today more than nearly ½ of all RID approved training takes place online. However, how do we know this is effective education or not. This webinar will focus on the current state of online education as supported through RID Approved Sponsors. Participants will have the benefit to listen to a panel experienced in produce successful online educational programming for interpreters.

    When the RID Certification Maintenance Program was first launched in 1985 the only distance learning was attending conferences or conventions.  Today more than nearly ½ of all RID approved training takes place online.  However, how do we know this is effective education or not.  This webinar will focus on the current state of online education as supported through RID Approved Sponsors.  Participants will have the benefit to listen to a panel experienced in produce successful online educational programming for interpreters.

  • Discovering the Keys to a Purpose-Driven Future

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​As history presents a rearview look at what was done before, Wing will offer a personal lens to the development of sign language interpreting by providing a historical framework as a starting point. He will uncover trends that helped shape RID and its current context. In this plenary session, Wing will also suggest the significance of one’s personal journey as a key to creating today’s solutions for a more relevant and responsive RID.

    As history presents a rearview look at what was done before, Wing will offer a personal lens to the development of sign language interpreting by providing a historical framework as a starting point. He will uncover trends that helped shape RID and its current context. In this plenary session, Wing will also suggest the significance of one’s personal journey as a key to creating today’s solutions for a more relevant and responsive RID. How did we become a band of volunteers to full-time practitioners? And at what cost? What forces catapulted the speed of change that we experience in the field? Where do we want to go from here? How do we optimize RID’s purpose in our current context?

  • ​​Emerging Trends in Interpreting and Implications for Interpreter Education

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Cathy Cogen and Dennis Cokely will report on their recent study of emerging trends in interpreting and implications for interpreter education. The presentation will be organized into three primary sections: First, trends impacting current and future interpreting services assesses external trend areas that are broad in nature and have many long-term implications for the field of professionals providing services to individuals who are d/Deaf. Second, current issues in Interpreter Education describes several key dynamics at play within the field that may facilitate or impede efforts to address future interpreter education and professional development needs. Lastly, the final section of the presentation offers recommendations for aligning interpreter education with the challenges of tomorrow.

    Cathy Cogen and Dennis Cokely will report on their recent study of emerging trends in interpreting and implications for interpreter education. The presentation will be organized into three primary sections: First, trends impacting current and future interpreting services assesses external trend areas that are broad in nature and have many long-term implications for the field of professionals providing services to individuals who are d/Deaf. Second, current issues in Interpreter Education describes several key dynamics at play within the field that may facilitate or impede efforts to address future interpreter education and professional development needs. Lastly, the final section of the presentation offers recommendations for aligning interpreter education with the challenges of tomorrow. In many areas, the recommendations mark a significant departure from old ways of doing business. And we will issue a call to action, asking conference attendees to consider how they will participate - as practitioners, educators, researchers, and administrators. What partnerships, practices, and policies will they engage in and support toward creating a better future?  

    Cathy Cogen

    Dennis Cokely

  • Interpreting Depositions

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Depositions form a part of pre-trial discovery engaged in typically by attorneys in civil matters. When a Deaf witness is to be deposed, court interpreters will be engaged. Table interpreters may also be present to monitor the interpretation. Frequently, depositions are videotaped to preserve the interpretation in case of later challenge. Depositions can also be used as evidence during a trial to impeach a witness who testifies differently from their testimony during the deposition. Highly accurate and competent interpretation at depositions ensures that impeachment at trial does not become an examination into the quality of the prior interpretation at the deposition. This seminar will set forth the basic procedures involved in a deposition and will set forth the common ethical and staffing considerations for the interpreter hired to interpret for a deposition.

    Depositions form a part of pre-trial discovery engaged in typically by attorneys in civil matters. When a Deaf witness is to be deposed, court interpreters will be engaged. Table interpreters may also be present to monitor the interpretation. Frequently, depositions are videotaped to preserve the interpretation in case of later challenge. Depositions can also be used as evidence during a trial to impeach a witness who testifies differently from their testimony during the deposition. Highly accurate and competent interpretation at depositions ensures that impeachment at trial does not become an examination into the quality of the prior interpretation at the deposition. This seminar will set forth the basic procedures involved in a deposition and will set forth the common ethical and staffing considerations for the interpreter hired to interpret for a deposition. 

    Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting

  • Critiquing and Deconstructing Metaphors: A Normative Ethical Framework for Community Interpreters

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In 2000, Pym proposed that translators and interpreters adopt an approach of cooperation. In other words, practitioners should seek to enhance (or at least not prevent) the cooperation between interlocutors of other languages/cultures. Moreover, this proposition is in alignment with ideals from morality scholarship: Cooperation is the highest form of ethical reasoning. In community interpreting, this ideal is arguably evident in the frequently used metaphor of member of the team. This paper distills the “interpreter-as-team member” metaphor into a series of professional values to propose a framework that aligns with a cooperation-based, ethical framework for interpreters working in community settings.

    In 2000, Pym proposed that translators and interpreters adopt an approach of cooperation. In other words, practitioners should seek to enhance (or at least not prevent) the cooperation between interlocutors of other languages/cultures. Moreover, this proposition is in alignment with ideals from morality scholarship: Cooperation is the highest form of ethical reasoning. In community interpreting, this ideal is arguably evident in the frequently used metaphor of member of the team. This paper distills the “interpreter-as-team member” metaphor into a series of professional values to propose a framework that aligns with a cooperation-based, ethical framework for interpreters working in community settings.

  • Collaborative Storytelling on Social Justice

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar is 0.125 Professional Studies CEUs in the Power, Privilege, and Oppression category. ​This plenary storytelling session is one of the best communication techniques that inspire while highlighting the best moments in a narrative style. These stories will set the stage for Tuesday’s Social Justice Roundtable. Stories will involve how we may discuss concerning trends, diversity and dismantling unwanted systems. Stories in this session will reflect on different aspects of social justice from their professional roles and life experiences. Participants leave having additional experiences to related to their own working stories.

    This plenary storytelling session is one of the best communication techniques that inspire while highlighting the best moments in a narrative style. These stories will set the stage for Tuesday’s Social Justice Roundtable. Stories will involve how we may discuss concerning trends,diversity and dismantling unwanted systems. Stories in this session will reflect on different aspects of social justice from their professional roles and life experiences. Participants leave having additional experiences to related to their own working stories.

    Dave Coyne

    Joseph Hill