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  • Power & Privilege: Deaf and Hearing Interpreters' Experiences

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    How do Deaf and hearing interpreters talk about power and privilege when they reflect on their work? This presentation discusses the experiences of interpreters from Canada and the U.S. and their views on constructs of power and privilege dynamics in interpreted interactions. The data we will share showed intersections among power and privilege, interpreters' sense of agency, interpreters' conceptualization of the task of interpreting, negative power dynamics among Deaf and hearing teams, and the need for specialized training about these concepts and how to work together effectively as D/H teams.​

    (This recording does not include the first 10 minutes of the webinar, however the missing information can be found in the transcript below) How do Deaf and hearing interpreters talk about power and privilege when they reflect on their work? This presentation discusses the experiences of interpreters from Canada and the U.S. and their views on constructs of power and privilege dynamics in interpreted interactions. The data we will share showed intersections among power and privilege, interpreters' sense of agency, interpreters' conceptualization of the task of interpreting, negative power dynamics among Deaf and hearing teams, and the need for specialized training about these concepts and how to work together effectively as D/H teams.

  • Returning to Ethics: A Meta-ethical Analysis of Community Interpreters’ Codes and Standards of Practice

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In 2001, Pym made an appeal for the field to return to ethics. In response, this paper problematizes the ethical framework offered to community interpreters. Metaphors (e.g., conduit/advocate) are often employed to describe practitioners’ behaviors and have since emerged in pedagogy and training materials as an ethical device (e.g. interpretersshould or should not be a conduit). However, devices used to describe behaviors are not the same as those used to propose or evaluate behaviors. Normative ethics dictates the use of terms that evaluate the consequences of practice decisions in light of a profession’s values. As such, an alternative framework is proposed.

    In 2001, Pym made an appeal for the field to return to ethics. In response, this paper problematizes the ethical framework offered to community interpreters. Metaphors (e.g., conduit/advocate) are often employed to describe practitioners’ behaviors and have since emerged in pedagogy and training materials as an ethical device (e.g. interpretersshould or should not be a conduit). However, devices used to describe behaviors are not the same as those used to propose or evaluate behaviors. Normative ethics dictates the use of terms that evaluate the consequences of practice decisions in light of a profession’s values. As such, an alternative framework is proposed.

  • Secrets to Share with Deaf People about Interpreting in Court

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​In legal interpreting seminars, it is often said that court interpreting is different from community interpreting. At times, these differences can pose ethical demands when interpreters feel constrained to conduct themselves in a manner that would be objectionable in a community setting. Court interpreters have an obligation to explain these conflicts and the rationale behind them to Deaf consumers in a considerate manner. This educational piece is a critical link to improve the relations between court interpreters and the communities we serve. This seminar will address the key protocol which presents a conflict between community and legal interpreting and suggest methods and rationale to be incorporated into the discussion with the Deaf consumer prior to interpreting in court.

    In legal interpreting seminars, it is often said that court interpreting is different from community interpreting. At times, these differences can pose ethical demands when interpreters feel constrained to conduct themselves in a manner that would be objectionable in a community setting. Court interpreters have an obligation to explain these conflicts and the rationale behind them to Deaf consumers in a considerate manner. This educational piece is a critical link to improve the relations between court interpreters and the communities we serve. This seminar will address the key protocol which presents a conflict between community and legal interpreting and suggest methods and rationale to be incorporated into the discussion with the Deaf consumer prior to interpreting in court.

    Target Audience: Interpreters interested in legal interpreting 

  • Serving VR Clients: Demographics, Procedures and Services

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will look at the deaf individuals who are served by VR by 1) exploring the demographics of clients, 2) identifying the procedures that must be followed in order for a deaf individual to receive VR services, and 3) what type of services are provided to VR clients. This information will help interpreters to more fully appreciate the VR context and the needs of clients that are served.

    This webinar will look at the deaf individuals who are served by VR by 1) exploring the demographics of clients, 2) identifying the procedures that must be followed in order for a deaf individual to receive VR services, and 3) what type of services are provided to VR clients.  This information will help interpreters to more fully appreciate the VR context and the needs of clients that are served.

  • Skills Development for VR Interpreters: Models and Resources

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The focus of this webinar is on strategies and resources for developing interpreting skills for working in the VR setting. Practical ideas for how to work independently and/or in small group to enhance skill performance will be discussed. As well, sources for accessing skill development resources will be identified.

    The focus of this webinar is on strategies and resources for developing interpreting skills for working in the VR setting. Practical ideas for how to work independently and/or in small group to enhance skill performance will be discussed. As well, sources for accessing skill development resources will be identified.

  • Interpreting in Family Court

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Interpreters often find themselves interpreting in a myriad of domestic matters from contested divorces to child custody cases to the division of marital property. Interpreting for family law cases presents unique demands procedurally and interpersonally particularly when interpreting between adverse parties. Ethically, family law cases can be demanding and require quick thinking and action on the interpreter’s part. This session will explore the various matters an interpreter may be called to interpret, will explore the ethics involved in interpreting between hostile deaf parties, and will discuss specific legal vocabulary and definitions related to family law matters.

    Interpreters often find themselves interpreting in a myriad of domestic matters from contested divorces to child custody cases to the division of marital property. Interpreting for family law cases presents unique demands procedurally and interpersonally particularly when interpreting between adverse parties. Ethically, family law cases can be demanding and require quick thinking and action on the interpreter’s part. This session will explore the various matters an interpreter may be called to interpret, will explore the ethics involved in interpreting between hostile deaf parties, and will discuss specific legal vocabulary and definitions related to family law matters. 

  • Introduction to Active Shooter Response Training for the Deaf and Interpreters

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Introduction to Active Shooter Response training for the Deaf and Interpreters – a cursory discussion on the terms, definitions, meanings, and means for preparation and response to an Active Shooter Incident for individuals whom are Deaf, hard of hearing, and/or American Sign Language Interpreters.

    Introduction to Active Shooter Response training for the Deaf and Interpreters – a cursory discussion on the terms, definitions, meanings, and means for preparation and response to an Active Shooter Incident for individuals whom are Deaf, hard of hearing, and/or American Sign Language Interpreters.

    Topics covered include: basic personal preparation and readiness, how to start the dialogue of response procedures with colleagues and clients, the need for continuing training in both preparation and response, and a survey of trainings available online and in-person. The target audience for this course are interpreters who desire skills and knowledge to be prepared in a variety of settings.

    After completing this course, learners will be able to explain the steps to take if confronted with an active threat, explain what to do when police arrive on the scene, and utilize resources for further training. These learning objectives will be presented with emphasis on the ethical considerations of the American Sign Language Interpreter for the Deaf as defined by the RID Code of Professional Conduct, specifically the applicability of confidentiality (1.0) in regards to reporting suspicious or threatening behavior in the workplace and/or in an educational setting (1.3) and the necessity of specific professional development (7.0) within the auspices of specific requirements by the Interpreter’s respective employer (7.1,7.2).

    ​Aaron E. Shoemaker

    Aaron E. Shoemaker is a Nationally Certified Interpreter living and working in the Atlanta metropolitan area. Aaron is a Native Signer, born to a hearing father and hearing mother who are both Sign Language Interpreters. His father served a mission to the Deaf for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and later taught his children to sign the language and respect the culture. Aaron is an Eagle Scout and has continued to volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America for most of his adult life, including service as a Scoutmaster in a Deaf troop. He has taught Sunday School and other church classes for over 20 years, including several years at the Phoenix Deaf Branch. Aaron completed his basic training as an Emergency Management Interpreter for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing in 2012 and has since gone on to become a Georgia Emergency Management Agency/Homeland Security (GEMA/HS) Certified CERT Instructor in 2014 and complete CERT Train-the-Trainer and CERT Program Manager courses at the FEMA Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, Maryland in 2016. All Hands On delivered Deaf CERT Basic in American Sign Language in February of 2016 and made Deaf history as the first time this was ever done anywhere in the USA. He completed his Search and Rescue training in the summer of 2016 and now serves Cobb County Search and Rescue as the only Interpreter in the USA currently attached to an active SAR team. Aaron then delivered Deaf CERT Train the Trainer fully in American Sign Language in January 2017, becoming the first ever CERT Program Manager in the USA to do so. Aaron is the husband of Kiesha Shoemaker, an Interpreter, teacher of the Deaf, and teacher of American Sign Language. They are the proud parents of six children. Aaron currently serves as the Executive Director of All Hands On, inc, a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to elevating awareness for the needs of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and bringing Deaf and Emergency Managers together in preparing for times of emergency and disaster.

  • Invest in your Future by Incorporating Another World Language into your Work!

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Receive a 15% discount when you register and enter the “INVEST2019” code. Discount ends on July 31, 2019. This plenary presentation is a must attend if you want to learn about the rich history of Spanish in the U.S. and ways that you can invest in your future by becoming more knowledgeable and skilled in working with Spanish-speaking communities. You don’t want to miss learning about your opportunities for learning another major world language. You will learn about the various profiles of trilingual (Spanish-English-ASL) interpreters, from novices to experts. Perhaps you’ve taken Spanish courses before but never used the language professionally. You are perfect for this plenary workshop. If you are just curious, we would love to share with you how you can become a trilingual interpreter.

    This plenary presentation is a must attend if you want to learn about the rich history of Spanish in the U.S. and ways that you can invest in your future by becoming more knowledgeable and skilled in working with Spanish-speaking communities. You don’t want to miss learning about your opportunities for learning another major world language. You will learn about the various profiles of trilingual (Spanish-English-ASL) interpreters, from novices to experts. Perhaps you’ve taken Spanish courses before but never used the language professionally. You are perfect for this plenary workshop. If you are just curious, we would love to share with you how you can become a trilingual interpreter.

    David Quinto-Pozos

  • Interpreting in Domestic Violence Settings

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Domestic violence is a social problem that affects all sectors of society, and when Deaf people are involved, court and legal interpreters are called to interpret these high risk emotionally charged interactions. Many times, applications for protection from domestic violence are filed with little notice and implicate the need for emergency interpreting. From intake through final protective order hearings, this seminar will address the process and procedures generally followed as well as discuss the ethical and interpreting demands faced in these challenging matters.

    Domestic violence is a social problem that affects all sectors of society, and when Deaf people are involved, court and legal interpreters are called to interpret these high risk emotionally charged interactions. Many times, applications for protection from domestic violence are filed with little notice and implicate the need for emergency interpreting. From intake through final protective order hearings, this seminar will address the process and procedures generally followed as well as discuss the ethical and interpreting demands faced in these challenging matters.

  • DC-S and the Dialogic Work Analysis - Part I

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​The first webinar in this four part series introduced viewers to the theoretical framework of Demand-Control Schema (DC-S). Some viewers then participated in an online learning community were they learned to construct quality demand-control analyses (based on the eleven scales of the DC-S Rubric).

    The first webinar in this four part series introduced viewers to the theoretical framework of Demand-Control Schema (DC-S). Some viewers then participated in an online learning community were they learned to construct quality demand-control analyses (based on the eleven scales of the DC-S Rubric). This second webinar will educate viewers on how to discuss interpreting demands and controls using a paradigm of teleological ethics – ethics based on the consequences of decisions. Viewers will learn how to construct demand constellations and how to formulate an ethical structure that involves the weighing consequences of decisions in light of professional values and execution of professional responsibility.